Learn Proper Running Form to Increase Efficiency and Decrease Injury Risk

Running is the most simple and straightforward of fitness activities, so we generally don’t pay much attention to learning and refining proper running form. Consequently, there’s a widespread problem of joggers and runners with extremely inefficient technique that can lead to slower times and increased risk for injury.

Unfortunately, when you plod along at a jogging pace, the penalty for inefficient running form and lack of explosiveness is minimal. In contrast, when you sprint, you try to generate maximum explosive force with each footstrike, so even the slightest technique inefficiency or wasted motion delivers a severe performance penalty. Sprinting, Primal Blueprint Law #5, is a great way to clean up technique errors and drift in the direction of proper running form.

Read More: See The Definitive Guide to Sprinting, Part 1, and The Definitive Guide to Sprinting, Part 2 for everything you need to know about sprinting.

Here, we’ll break down the components of proper running form. If you struggle with some of the technical explanations, watch the technique instruction video to help you grasp the concepts.

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Benefits of Pairing Low-Carb Eating with Intermittent Fasting for Health and Weight Loss

Most of the low-carbers I know end up experimenting with intermittent fasting at some point in their journey, and most of the IFers I know end up drifting toward low-carb eating as time wears on.

Why?

Is it just a case of overlapping interests? Is it because when you stumble upon one big lie perpetrated by the experts—that cutting carbs will give you heart disease and leave your brain starving for energy/you must eat 6-8 small meals a day or else risk “starvation mode” and “slow metabolism”—you start questioning all the other advice they give?

It might be some of that. But a big reason why intermittent fasting and low-carb eating tend to converge is that they are synergistic. Doing one makes the other work better, and vice versa.

What are the benefits? What are the synergies?

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6 Concrete Ways to Rewire Your Brain for Successful Habit Change

We all know the grim stats about how many New Year’s resolutions fail. It’s not because making resolutions is hokey or people are inherently lazy. It’s because most resolutions come down to one of two things: adopting new (good) habits or breaking old (bad) habits, and habit change is hard.

People struggle at every step, from picking the right goals—ones that are motivating and achievable—through the implementation process.

The trick is to be strategic and intentional about changing your habits. Rather than relying on willpower and wishes, get good systems in place. As James Clear, author of Atomic Habits, says, “You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems.”

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Keto Egg Bake

Eggs and bacon or eggs and sausage with black or collagen coffee are typical keto breakfasts, but this keto egg bake is a nutrient-dense and satiating option for a weekend morning when you have a bit more time. Weave it into your Sunday meal prep routine, bake it, cool it, portion it and wrap in parchment paper, and store it in the refrigerator. On busy weekday mornings, take a portion out of the fridge to warm up on the counter, or to heat for a few minutes in the oven or toaster oven. Re-wrap the portioned egg bake in the parchment paper, grab a napkin (don’t forget your travel coffee mug), and you have breakfast on the go.

Instead of the hash browns or bread cubes you might typically find in an egg bake or breakfast casserole, we used grated turnips, but you could also substitute grated parsnips, zucchini, or even carrots or sweet potatoes if you want a Primal egg bake. We used ground chicken, but you could also use ground turkey, beef, sausage, bison, or lamb. Same thing for the other vegetables—instead of kale and cabbage, you could use Swiss or rainbow chard, shredded Brussels sprouts, or baby spinach.

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Weekly Link Love – Edition 64

Research of the Week
The environmental footprint of different diets is not what we’ve been led to believe.

Genetic analysis of ancient Hungarian conquerors.

Men on a low-fat diet may have lower testosterone.

Glucose metabolism takes center stage in Alzheimer’s.

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Intermittent Fasting: How It Works, Reasons to Try It & Considerations for Athletes

It’s curious how not eating can spark so many questions and debates. A practice born out of necessity for our ancestors, fasting for long stretches happened when weather or circumstance hampered hunting and gathering, or for shorter periods while on the hunt or foraging.

As food has become readily available and abundant in many countries, our near-constant state of food arousal can dull the hormonal drivers that regulate appetite and, ironically, lead us to want to counteract the overabundance with some restriction. When we eat too much too often, we get the natural inclination to push back from the table and vow not to consume another bite for a (possibly long) while.

Fasting, particularly intermittent fasting, is gaining popularity now as a weight loss and weight management tool. As some celebrities proclaim that intermittent fasting is one of their “secrets” to their hard Hollywood-worthy bods, more and more people will be keen to latch on. We compiled a list of our greatest hits on fasting and intermittent fasting to provide education and context around how intermittent fasting works, reasons you may want to try it, reasons you may not want to try it, and considerations for athletes who want to fast.

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